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    Hello Guest | Welcome To Jacquii's Poetry in Color Forum


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  1. Artistic

    PaintedDiary JPiC Mentor

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    What is your favorite line (s) of poetry and / or stanza (s) of poetry, by whom and why?

    It is very difficult to pick out lines of poetry or stanzas that move us, for there are many.

    However, it would be really great to create a list and discuss what poetry moves members of JPiC, has an impact on us, and perhaps explain why.

    Additionally, we will be learning of perhaps poets or poems we have not heard of, read before, from other countries and cultures as well, thus can be quite educational.

    You don't have to list all at once...and I know you will be back to post again...lol

    To summarize...

    1}Let's Post the Authors Name

    2} Post Title of Piece (In case others may want to look the poem up)

    3}Post The Line (s) and / or Stanza (s)

    4}Last, (if you like to share and may be the most important part)....Post why those words have such an impact on you or why or how does the line (s) and / or stanza (s) move you.


    I will start.....




    T.S. Eliot "The Waste Land"

    "I have shored against my ruins"


    I love this line as I feel massive strength from these six words!

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    MsJacquiiC Poetica Magnifique

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    Nice thread! Langston Hughes is one of my favorites and a few lines from one of his poems:

    Beauty for some provides escape,
    who gain a happiness in eyeing the
    gorgeous buttocks of the ape or
    Autumn sunsets exquisitely dying.


    Edited: I thought this was quoted from Hughes but after searching for the quote on google (cause google's my friend) it seems to be attributed to Aldous Huxley's "Ninth Philosopher's Song" ---- Anyway - whoever wrote it = EXCELLENT lines and one of my favorites!


    Posted By MsJacquiiC | Mar 8, 2008
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  3. Artistic

    PaintedDiary JPiC Mentor

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    Yes! Love Mr. Hughes!

    Here is a brilliant poet I wrote about in college and wanted to share...His work was astounding as a slave and not too many people know of his work...his name is

    Jupiter Hammon

    Jupiter Hammon
    (born October 17, 1711 – died 1806) was a Black poet and the first published Black writer in America, a poem of his appearing in print in 1760. He was a devout Christian, believing in God and striving to live for Him . He is considered one of the founders of African American literature.

    Hammon was a slave his whole life, owned by four generations of the Lloyd family on Long Island, New York. However, he was allowed to attend school, and thus (unlike many slaves) was able to read and write.

    Here is a verse from ""Chapter 2: Jupiter Hammon's Poem to Phillis Wheatley"


    When God shall send His summons down,
    And number saints together.
    Blest angels chant, (triumphant sound)
    Come live with me forever.
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    MsJacquiiC Poetica Magnifique

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    Wow - What wonderful informations MS KIM - I'd never heard of Hammon before -This is quite incredible post - to FINALLY know the 1st published Black in American literature :wow: Thanx for posting!

    Jacquii.


    Posted By MsJacquiiC | Mar 9, 2008
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    solo New Member

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    These lines from William Blake are my favorites

    From: Auguries Of Innocence

    To see a world in a grain of sand
    And a heaven in a wild flower,
    Hold infinity in the palm of your hand
    And eternity in an hour.

    Why?...because they say so much in such a compact way...and apart from that...it's just plain beautiful....lol, I'm not much of a critic/analyst...I just get reduced to paroxysms of "Beautiful, just beautiful!!!"


    Yeah, I have heard of Langston Hughes...a visiting american read me some...he 's good stuff too!:). Must make a point of getting hold of some more of his poetry.


    solo
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    Posted By solo | Mar 10, 2008
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    MsJacquiiC Poetica Magnifique

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    Mr. HUGHES is indeed fabulous poetry! But I must say - I agree with you - those BLAKE lines are simply exquisite! Thanx for the share ;)

    Jacquii.


    Posted By MsJacquiiC | Mar 10, 2008
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    PaintedDiary JPiC Mentor

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    Thanks Ms Jacquii..he was incredible indeed! This is a great thread to learn and to share!

    Kim :):girltender:
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    PaintedDiary JPiC Mentor

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    :wow: Thanks for posting this solo! Yes the lines are quite beautiful and memorable!

    PD :):girltender:

    JolieH JPiC Contributor

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    I thought and thought about this. I have read a thousand poems over the past few months, and not one came to mind - not on particular anyway, and then I remembered, oh yes, Macbeth... I love Macbeth - the story that is, He's a fool but the stories great. The witches cantations are really cool,

    William Shakspeare
    Macbeth,
    act IV, scene I

    ALL.
    Double, double, toil and trouble;
    Fire, burn; and caldron, bubble.

    SECOND WITCH.
    Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the caldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg, and howlet's wing,--
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.


    ALL. (witches)
    Double, double, toil and trouble;
    Fire, burn; and caldron, bubble.


    THIRD WITCH.
    Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
    Witch's mummy, maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
    Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark,
    Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Sliver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk, and Tartar's lips,
    Finger of birth-strangl'd babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,--
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingredients of our caldron.


    Posted By JolieH | Mar 11, 2008
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    solo New Member

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    Truly chilling lines

    "Liver of blaspheming Jew,
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Sliver'd in the moon's eclipse,
    Nose of Turk, and Tartar's lips,"
    lolololol.....!


    and I was wondering what to have for supper!


    Posted By solo | Mar 15, 2008
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    MsJacquiiC Poetica Magnifique

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    Oh Good GAWD! :LOL:
    wow - And to think Shakespeare considered "demure" in relation to other poets of the time... Some of that quoted from MacBeth is downright gory, the Jew line = :wow: Interesting no doubt... I don't think I'd be trying that stew though...

    Jacquii.

    Kit Carson JPiC Contributor

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    Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
    And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
    Do not go gentle into that good night.
    ~
    Dylan Thomas
    ~
    "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"
    ~
    Read this in high school and I think if helped me to realize how words you write can be so profound and long lasting. This is considered the best example of Villanelle ever done. I'll never argue with that, but I hope someday that someone else will.
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    MsJacquiiC Poetica Magnifique

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    Hmmm - don't think I can argue with it either MIKE - but I don't think I've a villanelle in my arsenal just yet :p --- And yes! I think I actually posted a challenge for poetry featuring that one particular line "Don't go gentle into that good night..." Maybe perhaps a poem based on that line... Yep - I searched - it's a POEM actually based off of another line: Rage rage against the dying of the light... http://jpicforum.info/miscellaneous/tis-gentle-knight-calling-2599.html

    Anyway - a FABULOUS poem no doubt - and right up there with the most quoted of any poetry I'd say. Perhaps we should have a Creativity Outlet challenge - the stipulation being to use either/or line within the poem... Hmmmm.... Thinking....

    :goodpost:

    Jacquii.
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    PaintedDiary JPiC Mentor

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    Fantabulous posts Jolie, solo, Ms Jacquii, Mike, and everyone....just :wow:...let's keep this going!

    Ms Jacquii...you also posted that poem as an example for the "Villanelle" in the Poetry-Defined Forum...:)

    p.s.----->Sounds like a lovely challenge...:)


    Dr. Rob :)
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    butchiesmom JPiC Premium VIP Member

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    I'm a fan of Robert Frost and of Maya Angelou. I can remember my professor reading from I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings (I think that's the title) about her toothache and getting the tooth pulled. My teeth ached so bad just listening to it! I was so impressed and fascinated by just that account that I went to the library and got that book! I know it's not a poem, but it was one of the reasons why I wanted to write because I wanted to be able to write as well as that.

    Robert Frost The Road Not Taken


    The last three lines of the last stanza:

    Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.

    I remembered this from seventh or eighth grade English class. It's stuck with me all these years. "...the one less traveled by,..." I think of it often when I think of my life and how I've never traveled the path expected by others. It's why I consider myself 'unique' not 'weird'. Why should we always take the road everyone else does? I want to see what few others have seen, lol.

    This is a great thread, Kim!
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    PaintedDiary JPiC Mentor

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    Thanks Gail!! I I agree 100% !!!!!!!!! Time to hear from some of our new members and back again!! :fan1:
  13. Cool

    nomadicrhymer JPiC Premium VIP Member

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    Yes, I do remember Robert Frost... love his work as well. I do like Sir Walter Raleigh as well... his entire piece "The Lie" I LOVE LOVE!!! but I will only pick one stanza, as directed... well maybe 2! lol!

    Say to the court, it glows
    And shines like rotten wood;
    Say to the church, it shows
    What's good, and doth no good:
    If church and court reply,
    Then give them both the lie.

    Tell zeal it wants devotion;
    Tell love it is but lust;
    Tell time it is but motion;
    Tell flesh it is but dust:
    And wish them not reply,
    For thou must give the lie

    Here, Raleigh is supposedly awaiting execution, which is think is the only way he would have had a change of heart from his lifestyle, which was clearly in the extravagant court and as one of Elizabeth the First’s men… he was famous for laying down his cloak so that she could step across a puddle of water if I remember correctly. This poem is written as if he is totally disillusioned by every facet of life and all he has grown up knowing as truth to this point.
  14. Cool

    nomadicrhymer JPiC Premium VIP Member

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    Yes, I do remember Robert Frost... love his work as well. I do like Sir Walter Raleigh as well... his entire piece "The Lie" I LOVE LOVE!!! but I will only pick one stanza, as directed... well maybe 2! lol!

    Say to the court, it glows
    And shines like rotten wood;
    Say to the church, it shows
    What's good, and doth no good:
    If church and court reply,
    Then give them both the lie.

    Tell zeal it wants devotion;
    Tell love it is but lust;
    Tell time it is but motion;
    Tell flesh it is but dust:
    And wish them not reply,
    For thou must give the lie

    Here, Raleigh is supposedly awaiting execution, which is think is the only way he would have had a change of heart from his lifestyle, which was clearly in the extravagant court and as one of Elizabeth the First’s men… he was famous for laying down his cloak so that she could step across a puddle of water if I remember correctly. This poem is written as if he is totally disillusioned by every facet of life and all he has grown up knowing as truth to this point.
  15. Surrender

    Medora Member

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    I can give many examples, but I will start with one that readily comes to mind. To some English Professors I blaspheme by choosing lyrics, and I do not care. The following is from American independent folk singer-songwriter Vienna Teng's "Whatever You Want":
    If I correctly understand, here she gives haunting glimpses into what Kate Chopin in "The Story of an Hour" refers to as the "powerful will bending hers in that blind persistence with which men and women believes they have a right to impose a private will upon a fellow creature." I am also in love with some of her phrasing, such as "curating your domestic museum" and "dress wearing a face in the doorway."
    • Like Like x 1


    Posted By Medora | Oct 1, 2012
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    MsJacquiiC Poetica Magnifique

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    Yes! Her phrasing is immaculate. I especially loved the "She is a dress wearing a face in the doorway" line. And interesting you should post lyrics. As the British poet & critique Samuel Taylor Coleridge said, "I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry; that is, prose = words in their best order; -- poetry = the best words in the best order." ---

    More recognizeably quoted as "Prose = words in their best order; -- poetry = the best words in the best order." I would take it a step further to


    I must say - I hadn't heard of Vienna Teng before you posted :blush: But I'm proud to have made her acquaintance = Lovely piece of music. And for the naysayers (aka those who think you'd blaspheme for breathing poetry & lyric in the same breath) Music IS Poetry!

    J.


    Posted By MsJacquiiC | Oct 1, 2012
    #20

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